The reality of the dairy industry

Earlier this month BBC Panorama released an expose into the diary industry. The programme contained undercover footage of a dairy farm in Wales and showed very graphic footage of abuse and violence towards the cows, the calves that were of no use being piled into skips and just the overall low conditions of the farm itself. Obviously it received quite a bit of backlash, with many farmers claiming that this was not an accurate depiction of what happens within a dairy farm: Some farmers were claiming that they loved their cows and treated them with the highest degree of animal welfare, and that this farm in Wales was an outlier that did not do the dairy industry any justices. Which made me start to question what the conditions of a dairy farm should be and while the vegan in me knows that there is no way to have exploitation free dairy farming, the academic in me wanted to look into whether there could be such a a thing as humane dairy farming.

Now of course when researching this matter there are so many different resources to use and I have tried to keep things as balanced as possible. I will link all of the articles I have found throughout this little essay, but I am not going to go too in detail about the legitimacy of each source (i.e who funded the research, who wrote the article, the political platforms on which I found them, the degree of neutrality of them all etc) and that alone could be an entire essay subject all of it’s own. As with all things, make sure you check sources and to always take everything you read online with a pinch of salt: I am trying to remain as unbiased as possible in order to open the avenue for discussion, but as this is a subject I am very passionate about I am sorry if some of the bias comes through!

How is milk actually made?

According to Dairy UK there are roughly 1.9 million dairy cows currently being used in the UK. According to the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) they predict a total of 12.52 billion litres for 2021/22. This may seem like a lot of milk, however this is 1.2% lower than the 2020/21 year. They also state that there have been dips in milk production over the past two years due to changes in calving seasons, which leads me onto the next point.

A cow is a mammal, and as such only produces milk when they have a baby. According to Diary UK a cow can produce milk for around 10 months after giving birth to a calf. One of the biggest arguments against dairy farming is how it treats the calves: Female cows are raised to become dairy cows like their mothers and the male calves are either destroyed, used for breeding programmes or sold to veal farms. AHDB even have a whole section on how to raise the female calves quickly to ensure that the farmers make a profit on them by the time they have had their second lactation.

But once you have a pregnant cow, they will be pregnant for around 9 months. During this 9 months they will begin to produce milk and can be milked during their pregnancy. Milking then stops when the cow gets to around 60 days before she is due to give birth, which is known as the ‘dry period’ where farmers are to let the cows’ udders heal prior to their calf’s birth. One reason for this is because, as with all births, cow births can be very traumatic, and if you have a cow that is too stressed out or unsettled leading up to birth then the farmer runs the risk of complications during the birth, injuries to both the cow and the calf, and in some worst situations stillbirths or unhealthy cows and calves that cannot be used the next year. After giving birth a cow can then be re-inseminated after 28-30 days.

Baby calves are then separated from the mothers immediately and put onto a food called colostrum, which is a milk-like fluid made my mammals who have just given birth. Over a period of time the calf is then weaned off of the colostrum and put on a different type of feed until they are ready to be used for dairy production. And the cycle repeats itself for the female calves until they stop producing milk and are then sent to slaughter for beef production.

Which clearly shows how a dairy cow spends the majority of a twelve month period pregnant. I will admit when trying to find information on all of this, the actual official websites were very sparing on the details and their websites are not at all user friendly. It seems the majority of the information is contained in their publications and of course these publications are only available if you purchase them or subscribe to them through some sort of union. I did find one though from the AHDB which was a very intensive guide on how to promote calving seasons and how to ensure a healthy calving season every year and to maximise profits.

Which is what really gets to me: the cows used in dairy are seen as nothing but means of production. Their sole purpose to to make a product that their farmers can profit from, and once they stop making a profit for the farmer then they are sent to the beef industry. But where does this language come from?

The laws for dairy farming

Under UK law all domestic animals are considered chattel i.e they are property. Your cat, dog, rabbit, cow, sheep, llama. They are nothing more than property in the eyes of the law, so whatever they do you as their human owner are responsible for. There are numerous law cases surrounding personal injury claims where a dog has bitten someone and the human owner has been held negligent for the behaviours of their animal. This is governed by the Animal Act 1971 where strict liability applies if your animal causes harm to another person or property. However the Animal Welfare Act 2006 sets out that anyone who is in charge of an animal (be it as a pet, livestock, boarding situation etc) must not cause any ‘unnecessary suffering’ to that animal. If they do cause unnecessary suffering then they will be guilty of an offence and face criminal charges under this act.

Now there is no definition as to what counts as ‘unnecessary suffering’ stated within the act, so case law needs to be very heavily relied upon. I will not go into the details of this here (as again it is a LOT and would require a LOT of reading, re-reading and cross referencing and again will most likely need to be a whole separate essay on its own to really get into) but as a basic that is the standard that animal welfare standards are measured against. For those who may not know, and as a real side note, I am currently a trainee solicitor and during my law degree we spent many a module on ‘the reasonable man’ as a standard for measuring why certain actions were done. Again, it is a whole issue that is up for debate and is a whole other essay on it’s own. But I digress…

In England The Farm Animal Welfare Council provide opinions to the relevant government bodies (Mostly DEFRA) on how welfare is and/or is not being met within farming industries. One of the main issues that constantly arises in their opinions is that as the demand for milk has fallen over the years, in an attempt to improve profitability and to keep their farms running, farmers are allowing welfare standards to fall. According to Compassion in World Farming, most dairy cows have a life expectancy of around 3-5 years as dairy cows are highly prone to lameness and mastitis.

Now despite extensive online searches I cannot find anywhere government related that states the exact space that a cow needs to live in in order for their welfare needs to be met. I found another publication from AHDB and one from the RSPCA that state that the environment must be ‘adequate’ for the cow’s welfare. Which states nothing really, because again it is very open to interpretation and can change from farm to farm. There is no consistency in how welfare is managed and (at least from my research) enforcement of those welfare standards seem to be very subjective. You have a number of bodies (DEFRA, RSPCA and farming unions) who appear to be working together to increase welfare standards but a lot of this seems to be on the mutual understanding that farmers will simply ‘just do them’. I have not been able to find any real reports on who inspects the animal welfare, how often these are carried out or what happens if you are not meeting these standards.

This yet again beings me back to the main issue with dairy farming (aside from the animals themselves) is that the law does not adequately define what is and is not allowed. The same could be argued for all animal welfare standards across the world as the laws have so much room for interpretation and therefore it is up to the courts to decide whether welfare needs have been met. But again the court can only make decision on a matter if there is a question on whether welfare needs have been met by a specific farm/farmer/individual. Many of the articles I have found state that mastitis (a condition in dairy cows where their udders become inflamed either due to infection or trauma that can be fatal) and lameness (where cows can no longer walk and have lesions on their hooves and legs that cause intense pain) are serious concerns within the dairy industry and many steps are being taken to try and eradicate these problems to improve the profitability of dairy farming.

Mastitis and lameness though are also both conditions that are directly impacted by the environment in which a cow lives. Lameness is brought on where a cow is made to stand for too long, not able to move around properly or is made to stand on uneven/unsuitable flooring for long periods of time. Mastitis is thought to be caused by over milking, where the instruments used to milk a cow are not cleaned properly or are not applied correctly or comfortably and as a result cause infections and trauma to the udders. Both issues clearly highlight though that the welfare positions in place are clearly not enough to solve these very common and clearly very prolific problems within the dairy industry.

Exploitation?

Now there is also the debate to be had over whether factory farming versus family farms. If I had a cow, that lost her calf at birth, would it still be exploitative for me to milk her? What right do I have to milk her? According to Alberta Milk, cows need to be milked to avoid their udders becoming engorged and uncomfortable for the cow. But again this is on an industrial level milking farm, where you want to make a profit from the milk that your cows are producing. I have been able to find very little information on the benefits of milking a cow: There are numerous articles on how milking a cow is beneficial for us (for health, money, productivity on the farm) but I have not been to find any that actually deal with it from the cows point of view. I would imagine that yes, at first the cows udders may get very engorged and uncomfortable, the same way that a woman’s breasts do when they have just given birth. But after a while milk production would slow down, less milk will need to be expelled, until eventually no milk is made at all. Again this is just my assumption, but surely that is standard biology?

Now when you look at how the dairy industry functions, how can it not be exploitative? Cows are kept constantly pregnant, their babies are taken from them, their milk is farmed, treated and then sold on mass for a high profit, and as soon as the cow is no longer producing milk she is then sold to slaughter. How is there any other way to look at this? All of the publications I read from farming unions and pro-dairy organisations referred to the cows and the calves as a production machine – cows exist so that we can milk them and once they stop making milk they are destroyed because they no longer serve a purpose to us. The articles (if you do want to read them) talk about the cows as though they are machines and that it is the role of a farmer to learn how to completely control their cows, from when they go into heat to when they calf to when they can be destroyed.

And I know that there will be some people who will argue that if we stopped drinking dairy overnight what would happen to the cows. But the reality is that dairy cows only exist because we have selectively bread them to produce more milk than is needed. Plus, it is a stupid argument because the reality is that the world will not give dairy up overnight. It will be a gradual process, whereby less cows are bred to be dairy cows and so the number of cows left at the end of it will be a fractional amount of the current 1.9 million currently out there.

Conclusion

I always find that the reality speaks for itself. Dairy is not concerned with animal welfare and is only interested in making a profit for itself. Cows are no more than machines and it again highlights the capitalist ideology that as soon as something no longer provides you with a profit, you throw it away.

And there is a part of me that recognises that dairy farming is a huge and lucrative business (although that is on the decline currently) and they do produce a lot of jobs for the surrounding neighbourhoods. However, is that not the nature of industry? Is that not why competition exists? With the rise in plant-based milks why are dairy farmers not cutting their losses and investing money in to plant based alternatives? If they know that their cows are producing less milk and their profits are down,instead of investing 20% of their income to raising and rearing new dairy cows, why not use that money to invest in growing oats?

While dairy farming may have been a lucrative part of society, I feel that the world is changing at such a rapid rate that the farmers need to adapt or die. As does every single other industry out there at the moment. Even from a business perspective, surely this is the only thing that can be done?

If any of you want to discuss the issue, p[lease do leave me a comment or send me a message. Also if you have any other useful articles or resources for me to check please do pass them along!

T xxx

PSA: Batman Oreos

Just doing my civic vegan duty to announce to you all that Oreo have released limited edition oreos that have batman on them!

I know that America and (I think) Japan have oreos with Pokemon characters on them, so my hope is that one day they may make their way across the sea to me.

But for now I shall simply enjoy Batman Oreos. I mean they taste exactly the same – they have literally just added a little picture of Batman. But as quite the Batman fan, I find these way cooler than I should.

Overall: I need to get out more.

T xxx

‘The reality of…’ series

When I was thinking about ways to improve this little blog, I thought about some of the things I wish I had known more about before I started on my vegan journey. There is so much information out there that it can be very overwhelming to really know what the reality of a situation is: I knew that eating meat felt immoral to me, but why did i think this? I knew that most vegans don’t wear wool or silk, but what was this based on?

Veganism can tend to be viewed in a very black and white mind frame, in that you are either 100% perfect or you are a bad vegan. Even when I have looked into some of the issues for my own interest and for my own information, the amount of information was still too overwhelming to really wade through, and the information was at both ends of a spectrum: Either 100% good or 100% bad. There was very little middle ground, and I think that this middle ground is where many people sit when deciding whether or not to begin a vegan lifestyle.

I therefore thought it would be helpful to see both sides of the arguments on a number of different topics and issues. Hence, ‘The reality of…’ series was born! I really want to be able to not only deepen my own knowledge of a topic, but also to share that information with others and open up a chance for discourse and discussion. I do not believe that anything in life is as a simple and good and bad, and this is always something that has really interested me. It will also be interesting to see what new things we learn along the way and see if that in turn affects our views on other subjects.

I truly believe that a person can never be too informed about a situation and as someone who loves learning and reading up on different viewpoints and arguments, I am really looking forward to seeing where this series goes. I cannot guarantee when I will post them, as I already think some topics may be WAY more complicated than others and therefore will have way more information to read through. But I will be aiming for at least once a month to begin with and see how I get on with that!

If any of you guys have any topics or issues that you would like to discuss or wish me to research, then please do let me know in the comments, or even send me an email and I shall do my best to get through them!

T xxx

Legoland during a pandemic

One of my favourite places in the world is Legoland. I am also very lucky that I live about an hours drive from the Legoland Resort in Windsor. I have had this whole week off to celebrate my birthday, and it seemed only right to celebrate my birthday in true style!

As you can see, there were zero lines to get in!

If you have never been to Legoland, I would highly recommend it. It is big enough to keep you busy for a day but not so spread out that you end up walking for miles just to get to the different rides. It is also, for the majority of rides, all outside. Henry and I went on Monday and lucky for us it was pretty dead. There were still a lot of people, but no where near the crowds that we usually get when we go. It was therefore super easy to socially distance from the other guests and also meant we didn’t have to wait long at all for the rides. So win win!!

Me and my new adorable backpack!

The only downside is that the Star Wars Lego exhibit was shut. This is completely indoors though and it consists of a lot of Lego dioramas showing scenes from all of the movies. It is, without a doubt, the best thing at Legoland. And so I was a little bit gutted that it was shut. But that being said, it was all inside and is also very interactive, so trying to make that sort of attraction covid friendly would have been impossible.

While walking around the park they had regular sanitation stations and arrows on the floor showing which ways to walk. There were signs up to regularly wash your hands, face masks were to worn on certain rides and even the character interactions were wearing masks and promoting social distance. The staff were all lovely and were clearly doing their best to make sure that everyone still had a really lovely day out. You had to wear a mask on certain rides and in the shops, but as the whole park is outside you didn’t need to wear one if you are just walking around.

In a few rides, we were the only ones there!

The queues for the rides were unreal: The longest we waited was about 5 minutes, and that was purely because we had to walk through all of the aisles to get to the front. The times also seemed to include time for the staff to completely wipe down and disinfect the rides. The rides also made sure to leave rows of seats and carriages empty to promote social distancing and we did see on multiple occasions staff members in full bio-hazard suits deep cleaning areas of the park and carriages on the rides. They did all that they could to create a covid safe place and I believe that they did a really good job.

If you do want to visit Legoland I would highly recommend it. I should say that the restaurants do not have any vegan options at all, but there are some lovely areas around the park in which to have a picnic. Make sure to pack a big lunch with you and you’ll be fine. There also daily shows put on around the park where you can set up for lunch and watch some entertainment. There are also places to fill up water bottles, or to buy little snacks and drinks, so you won’t be completely out of luck. The ticket prices are expensive, but compared to most theme parks this one is probably one of the cheaper options. We were clever and used up our Tesco Clubcard points, so apart from petrol and parking, we essentially had a completely free day out!

Overall Legoland was an absolute delight. Henry and I have been so good during this entire pandemic – staying close to home, not really seeing anyone unless it’s outside – and Legoland was always our Happy Place. It felt so good to have some sort of normality back, to be able to just be a big kid for a day and to completely forget about how scary and crappy the world is right now. So stay safe everyone, and hopefully we can all get through this together.

T xxx

Kingdom Hearts 3: Worth the wait?

I know this may be a bit late to the game (no pun intended) as it did release in January this year. However, I am only now getting to the end of the game and thought now is as good a time as ever to discuss my thoughts on this game.

Slight disclaimer: I have only ever played Kingdom Heart 1 and 2, so chances are the majority of the characters in Kingdom Hearts 3 and the majority of the story is also very much lost on me. So if I sound like I don’t know everything about the franchise, that is because I don’t.

The good

Do not get me wrong, I LOVE Kingdom Hearts. I love Disney, so the chance to play an action packed RPG game that explores the various Disney worlds is my kind of game.

The worlds in Kingdom Hearts 3 are actually really well done and really immersive. The previous games made the worlds small, usually based around one route that you could take so that no matter what you were always heading in the right direction. The worlds in Kingdom Hearts 3 however are large and interactive: You can actually explore your surroundings and can actually spend quite a bit of time just wandering around the various worlds. It is the stuff dreams are made of!

Image result for kingdom hearts 3You can even take selfies! Which can lead to some pretty pictures and funny interactions with the various characters

The combat is also super fun. Granted it is quite a bit of button smashing, but as a player who cannot aim a weapon to save her life, the fact that I can just dance around the arena and spam the buttons makes the game so much more enjoyable. Kingdom Hearts 3 also adds to this by adding new combined moves that allow you to bring classic Disneyland rides into combat: thunder Mountain, the Carousel, Buzz Lightyear’s Blazer Blast, the Mad Tea Cups and more. They may be super overpowered in combat, but they’re so bright and fun it doesn’t really matter. It’s also nice to have a little bit of a change after the usual button smashing we are used to.

You can also go to new worlds that haven’t been featured before, and a lot more focused on Pixar films. You also have new summons, including Ariel, Simba, Wreck it Ralph and Stitch to name a few. The summons also make game play and combat that bit more exciting, and while none of it is overly difficult anyway, it’s just…fun. It’s such a fun game that you almost don’t care about the bad….almost.

The bad

The issue I have always had with Kingdom Hearts is the incredibly complicated story. I was with it at first: Bad forces are stealing hearts to bring sadness and anger to the Disney worlds. You – or namely, Sora – is tasked with the job of travelling through the various Disney worlds to banish the evil in them, return everyone’s hearts to them and save the Disney Princess who is currently being held captive by the bad guys so that they can be the vessels of darkness (I have paraphrased slightly, but that is my understanding of the game). Sounds great! Travelling around all the Disney worlds, meeting all of my childhood characters and exploring their worlds to save the day!

But no.

The story gets so confusing that I cannot even begin to explain it. I understand that once a person loses their heart, they become a heartless. But their heartless body becomes a nobody. Right, I’m with you there. BUT OH NO. Nobodies can then become somebodies (who tend to become playable other characters as the stories go on), such as Roxas or Namine in KH2. But these nobodies can have their own hearts which…means they aren’t nobodies? But they are someone else’s nobody? That’s as far as I get before I get lost and sadly that is only the beginning.

The Heartless

So. Many. CUT SCENES. Game play seems to last about 30 seconds and then I have to sit through 30 minutes of cut scenes, which only add more and more depth to an already complicated story so much so that I am completed disconnected from it all. Which is also why it has made it so difficult to get through the game: I have watched at least 5 hours of cut scenes, none of which I fully understood due to the story line. Don’t get me wrong, it is very pretty to watch and the cut scenes are clearly well made, but GOOD LORD, GET ON WITH IT. I do not care enough about this story to sit and watch a feature length movie about it all, that usually just makes me even more confused than before. It is really hard to get through the game, when all you want to do is progress and discover new worlds, but for every hour spent on the game you spend 45 minutes of that hour just watching cut scenes.

Image result for kingdom hearts 3

Final thoughts?

Sometimes less really is more. Get rid of the majority of the cut scenes, simplify the story that little bit and you would have a winner. Yes there are some die hard fans who lose their mind delving into the intricate details of the story, but for most of us we are here for the fun Disney aspect of it all: The characters are adorable, the game play is great fun and the story (at least at first) is enough to keep you guessing and tells a pretty concrete story. But when your ‘game’ is 90% cut scene, it might be time to rethink whether you are making a game or a movie.

What do you guys think about the new Kingdom Hearts game? Let me know your thoughts below!

T xx

Video Game of the week…

This week has been a tough one! From super busy schedules to super stressful work days, this week has felt like a crazy whirlwind of activities but also the longest week of the year. And sometimes no matter how hard you try, there are some things that not even a good work out can fix and you just need a complete dose of escapism from real life….and what better way to achieve this than with video games!

Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp

Animal Crossing has existed in the world of gaming since 2001, first appearing on the Nintendo 64. It has since then had 7 games released across the multiple gaming devices. Pocket Camp is the latest instalment of the Animal Crossing world and is also the first to be used on a mobile device.

The transition

Adorable. There are no other words for this game except that: ADORABLE.

It follows the general aspect of Animal Crossing in that you play as a little digital person who spends their time building the perfect community. It is an RPG world building type game, where you can create and build whatever type of society that you please: For example in New Leaf, you are the new Mayor of a small town. In Pocket Camp, you run a campsite. Throughout the game, your fellow inhabitants are anthropomorphic animals, from elephants to hamsters and all other manner of animals in between. You carry out activities for the animals from planting certain plants to building certain features and adding to the overall success of your chosen area.

In Pocket Camp you travel about the different areas and fulfil tasks for the visiting animals. In return, they give you certain supplies that can then be used to craft features and furniture for your camp site. Each time you complete a task for an animal you develop a better relationship with them which in turn helps level you up, and as you level up you can craft and build a bigger variety of items.

Interior design

On of the best things about Animal Crossing is the ability to create whatever environment you wish: In each game you are given you’re own little house which you can decorate however you like, and even the town itself can be moulded to look however you wish. In Pocket Camp, you are almost spoilt for decorating room as you have the main area of your campsite, where visiting animals can request certain items or pieces of furniture, as well as having your own personal camper-van which you can decorate as you own private residence. The game allows you to constantly change the campsite having different themes: You can build a tree house for the animals that love all thing ‘cute’ or a skating half pipe for those who love ‘cool’ things.

Challenges

Animal Crossing is a game that also uses real time in it’s game play: 24 hours in game is 24 hours out of it. The game also changes with the seasons allowing you to build little snowmen in the winter or celebrate Halloween in the fall. In the main games the seasons also change which animals or fruit you can collect throughout the year meaning that you have to play for at least a solid year in order to catch the hundreds of different creatures that the game has on offer.

Pocket Camp also uses this to release timed events during the seasons. Over the Christmas period you could collect candy canes to craft cosy festive items and in the New Year you could watch a firework display. The summer months brought summer festivals with fishing tourneys and flower challenges to create brightly coloured beautiful digital gardens and a little summer paradise. The upside to this is that you stay engaged with the game but the downside is that every item that is available for the limited event is also so darn cute that you become glued to your phone in order to get them all before the time runs out which is a whole new level of stress that only those who love collecting can really understand.

The Calm of Animal Crossing

Animal Crossing has always been a very calming game to play. Since there are no specific ‘quests’ that need to be completed, you can simply play the game at whatever pace suits you. The music is also calming as there is no real urgency for the game: It doesn’t matter if you want to play for 5 minutes or 5 years, the game ticks along as it needs to and you can spend your time with whatever activity you want to.

Pocket Camp is no different. As there are only 4 visiting areas, there are only 4 animals that have requests for you at any one time. Each animal has 3 requests to complete before they are satisfied, and depending on how much farming you’ve done before hand (catching fish or bugs or collecting fruit from trees and seashells off the beach) it will depend on how long it takes you to complete each task. At most, it can take about a half hour to finish all of the tasks (if that!) and I find this to be just the right amount of time to unwind: I can play it on my lunch break while I enjoy some food or even before bed instead of mindlessly scrolling through social media and making myself sad.

Outcome

This game is just as adorable as the others. The game is utterly charming, with each animal having their own style and wit. It is varied enough that you don’t get bored but also slow enough that you don’t feel any need to rush through the game. As there are no levels to complete you also don’t have to hit certain save points or checkpoints as the game just saves as you go on and each time you complete a task or change location. It is fun and calming and just utterly serene in every way.

Have any of you guys played this game? Let me know your thoughts below!

T xx

We are all animals

Throughout history, films have always had an impact on society: In most cases, they act as a platform for social commentary by highlighting issues within society, usually in a very subtle manner.

One film I have only recently seen has highlighted all of the issues that we are now seeing in modern day society. This film won Best Animated Picture at the Academy Awards 2016 and I am still moved by how well this cartoon highlighted the issues that we see in society everyday. Zootoptropolis (or Zootopia as it is sometimes called) highlights very common issues that are very rarely seen in these type of films: ignorance, prejudice, social class and racial stereotypes were all hidden under the pretence of predators vs prey in a society where animals of all shapes and sizes live together harmoniously.

This film doesn’t hold any punches: It is fun enough for children to watch it and still see the message in a lighthearted manner, while adults watching it are hit square in the face with how real the issues are. Watching the film, it struck me how it is essentially the same old story of Us vs Them. In society there always seem to be two sides that are fighting over very old, ignorant and stereotypical issues.

In this film, the main character is the adorable Judy Hops, the first ever bunny cop. She herself is one example of how you as a person can fight stereotypes, as throughout the film she is called ‘cute’ because she’s a bunny, and people assume that she is too sweet and too meek to ever make it as a real police officer in the big scary city of Zootropolis. She highlights the use of language when talking to other animals and how we should all think about our terms of reference before we open our mouths.

 disney disneyedit zootopia kp animationedit GIF

The film also highlights the way in which people can manipulate our prejudices towards people that are different to ourselves. In the film, (spoiler alert!) some prey animals want to infect all predators with a toxic plant that causes them to resort to aggressive and carnivorous behaviours. Throughout the film there is the underlying concern that all prey animals have that the predatory animals could very easily eat them if they wanted to, despite the clear fact that animals have evolved beyond this basic instinct. While it may not be seen as realistic, it helps to show how our own stereotypes of how people have behaved in the past affects how we think they are going to behave again: For example, there is the racial stereotype that all Chinese students are super smart or that all black people are ‘thugs’ or ‘ghetto’. There is little evidence to suggest that any of these are actually true, yet we are all exposed to these stereotypes on a daily basis, usually unknowingly. This is highlighted more in the film when Hops realises that even though she meant well and thought she was being PC, by assuming there is a ‘them’ and an ‘us’ she offends one of her newest friends.

Image result for zootropolis gifs so theres a them

I don’t want to go on about this film and its underlying components because I know this isn’t normally what I write about. But in recent times, with all the horrid stories we are hearing at the moment about Muslims being terrorists and the sexual harassment women have to deal with on a daily basis, this film made me think a lot about how we are all viewing each other. If a simple animation made for children can highlight how dangerous and how corrupt this type of thinking is, then why can’t a society see this? All in all, this film is wonderful. It’s funny, it’s silly, it’s sweet and it has some wonderful life lessons that people of all ages can learn from. If you haven’t, I highly recommend it…it may even help you see things from another perspective, and that is always a useful skill.

This may appear to be too insightful for a review on an animated Disney film, but I found it to yell loud and clear that while we all may be from very different walks of life and no matter how complicated our history may be, we are all animals and we are all equal. We can only move forward and build a society where all are welcome, all are equal and all we do we do in harmony.

Image result for mean girls bake a cake Mean Girls yet again with the truth…

What films have spoken to you guys? Has there been a film that made you rethink your priorities?

Much Love people 🙂

T xx